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DRYGUY Force Dry DX Review

August 6, 2017

 

Intro/Specs/Craftsmanship

 

If you spend any time outdoors fishing, hiking, playing sports, or whatever, chances are you've come home more than once with wet garments. Whether it's from rain, sweat, or wading in the water itself, putting away wet gear can lead to the formation of bacteria, fungus, and ultimately an unpleasant stench. In addition, these nasty little growths can lead to the premature breakdown of your favorite garment or piece of equipment, thus causing it to have a shorter lifespan.

 

 

What to do? It's best to dry anything that's wet as soon as possible to prevent a big stink and prolong the longevity of your gear. Leaving your stuff out in the sun is obviously one way to eliminate moisture, but when it comes to the insides of things like shoes, boots, and waders, there is often wetness leftover deep down inside. In such situations, a product like the DRYGUY Force Dry DX can be a big help!

 

 

Material: Plastic

Size: 12" D x 7.5" H x 15" W

Color: One (Grey)

Cord Length: 6 feet

Power Source: 120V AC Power Outlet

Price: $79.95

 

Crafted primarily of glossy grey plastic, the base Force Dry DX unit is compact and lightweight. Utilizing a central 80,000 hour-rated rotary blower, it blows a gentle stream of air through slots in each of the four long drying ports at the corners of the machine. The air is controlled with a front dial that allows you to set the machine to run up to 3 hours, and below that there's a switch that lets you choose between blowing unheated or heated air. Speaking of heated air, the machine will heat air to a max temperature of about 105 degrees F (40.5 degrees C), which is said to be friendly to even fragile garments and inner liners.

 

 

Also included with the basic unit are two 14" extension tubes with small clip-on "anvils" which allow you to mount/dry longer boots without blocking airflow. These tubes simply slide on/off the Force Dry DX's drying ports for use whenever needed.

 

The fit and finish of the unit and attachments left nothing to be desired. No loose pieces, sharp edges, or other defects were noted upon thorough inspection.

 

Testing

 

With four different drying ports per unit, up to four separate items can be dried at once. What kind of items? Along with various attachments available separately, the unit can accept a large list of stuff including helmets, gloves, shoes, socks, waders, and boots....to name a few. 

 

Since I live in South Florida I currently don't even own a pair of waders, but I do wet wade a lot with water shoes and can see this unit being very useful for drying them out. However, for the purpose of my first test, I took my dusty pair of Columbia hiking shoes outside for a thorough rinsing of the dust and muck, then immediately fitted them onto the unit to dry.

 

 

With the unit indoors (it's HOT and HUMID outside!), heat turned on, and timer set for one hour, I put the shoes on the unit literally sopping wet. By the time the hour was up, half of each shoe had dried considerably but still needed more time. I set another hour, and found that they still had a bit of dampness in the lower halves. Finally, another hour was set. After that hour expired, I checked the shoes and found they were just about completely dry, with just a small and very faint patch of moisture remaining around the heels of each shoe.

 

 

Don't expect a forceful blast of air from the unit; it's designed to circulate air gently so as to not harm certain materials. It gets the job done—be patient! Of course, dry time varies based on wetness, humidity, etc. My test was pretty extreme, as much of the time most folks (myself included) will probably just be attaching garments that are simply damp and not actually completely soaked and dripping all over the place.

 

 

Turning the front timer dial is smooth with no clicks or notches along the way. As the blower operates you can definitely hear it running, but it's unobtrusive and shouldn't interfere with a nearby nap or conversation. When the timer is up, it simply clicks off and the unit stops. An optional loud dinging or brief alarm sound would be a nice bonus!

 

 

I also received the optional and separate DRYGUY Wader Adapter ($29.95). Consisting of several pieces, this system includes extensions that give the entire unit approximately 44" of height from the floor to the top for hanging a pair of waders. For the longest pair of waders, additional extension tubes are even sold separately for even more height.

 

 

Also of note, the unit is plenty stable for holding up a pair of waders or boots. Although the base of the unit isn't extremely big or wide, the four small, flat feet provide ample stability so the whole thing shouldn't come toppling over unexpectedly.

 

Conclusion

 

In the past, I've typically rinsed out a pair of boots or shoes and set them outside to dry. If they mostly dried before sunset that was great, but if not I'd just bring them inside still damp. If it was cloudy or raining, forgetaboutit! That's where the Force Dry DX can really help matters.

 

 

Rain or shine, this unit lets you dry your wet gear. For the outdoors person and/or athletic type, this is surely a handy little machine. In fact, I can see it being really useful for something as simple as drying out my shoes just after a sweaty workout or jog. Give one a shot, I think you'll find it to be really handy. Stay dry!

 

DRYGUY Force Dry DX

 

 

 

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